INSPIRE

10 Inspirational Quotes From Harriet Tubman The Fearless African American

On Wednesday, U.S Treasury Secretary Jacob J. Lew said Tubman would replace Jackson on the front of the $20 bill, becoming the first woman in more than a century and first African American to grace the front of a paper note. Jackson will be featured on the back of the bill alongside an image of the White House.

Harriet Tubman was an American bondwoman who escaped from slavery in the South to become a leading abolitionist before the American Civil War. She was born in Maryland in 1820, and successfully escaped in 1849. Yet she returned many times to rescue both family members and non-relatives from the plantation system. She led hundreds to freedom in the North as the most famous “conductor” on the Underground Railroad, an elaborate secret network of safe houses organized for that purpose.

harriet tubman

 

We celebrate her legacy and look at some of her inspirational quotes.

1. “Slavery is the next thing to hell.”

Harriet Tubman to Benjamin Drew, St. Catharines, Ontario, Canada, 1855.

2. “I grew up like a neglected weed, – ignorant of liberty, having no experience of it. Then I was not happy or contented.”

Harriet Tubman to Benjamin Drew, St. Catharines, Ontario, Canada, 1855.

3. “Oh, Lord! You’ve been wid me in six troubles, don’t desert me in the seventh!”.

Harriet, The Moses of Her People, 1886.

4. “I said to the Lord, I’m going to hold steady on to you, and I know you will see me through.”

Harriet Tubman, Scenes in the Life of Harriet Tubman By Sarah Hopkins Bradford.

5. “When I found I had crossed that line, I looked at my hands to see if I was the same person. There was such a glory over everything; the sun came like gold through trees, and over the fields, and I felt like I was in Heaven”.

Harriet Tubman, Scenes in the Life of Harriet Tubman By Sarah Hopkins Bradford.

6. “I had crossed the line. I was free; but there was no one to welcome me to the land of freedom. I was a stranger in a strange land; and my home after all, was down in Maryland; because my father, my mother, my brothers, and sisters, and friends were there. But I was free, and they should be free.”

This photograph released by the Library of Congress and provided by Abrams Books shows Harriet Tubman in a photograph dating from 1860-75. Tubman was born into slavery, but escaped to Philadelphia in 1849, and provided valuable intelligence to Union forces during the Civil War. The image is one of nearly 500 photographs, lithographs, paintings, drawings and cartoons from the library's collection published in a new volume, "The American Civil War - 365 Days".  (AP Photo/Library of Congress)

This photograph released by the Library of Congress and provided by Abrams Books shows Harriet Tubman in a photograph dating from 1860-75. Tubman was born into slavery, but escaped to Philadelphia in 1849, and provided valuable intelligence to Union forces during the Civil War. The image is one of nearly 500 photographs, lithographs, paintings, drawings and cartoons from the library’s collection published in a new volume, “The American Civil War – 365 Days”. (AP Photo/Library of Congress)

Harriet Tubman, Scenes in the Life of Harriet Tubman By Sarah Hopkins Bradford

7. “I have heard their groans and sighs, and seen their tears, and I would give every drop of blood in my veins to free them”

Harriet Tubman, Harriet, the Moses of her People by Sarah Hopkins Bradford.

“There are two things I’ve got a right to, and these are, Death or Liberty – one or the other I mean to have. No one will take me back alive; I shall fight for my liberty, and when the time has come for me to go, the Lord will let them, kill me”. Scenes in the Life of Harriet Tubman By Sarah Hopkins Bradford

8. “I was the conductor of the Underground Railroad for eight years, and I can say what most conductors can’t say — I never ran my train off the track and I never lost a passenger.”

Harriet Tubman at a suffrage convention, NY, 1896.

9. “…and I prayed to God to make me strong and able to fight, and that’s what I’ve always prayed for ever since.”

Tubman to Ednah Dow Cheney, SC, 1865

10. “I was the conductor of the Underground Railroad for eight years, and I can say what most conductors can’t say — I never ran my train off the track and I never lost a passenger.”

Harriet Tubman at a suffrage convention, NY, 1896.

Source: Harriet-Tubman.org and wiki quote

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